Same Bill Gates that calls for vaccines to reduce human population invests in lab-grown meat company that hopes to sell “synthetic meat” to consumers

There is no doubt that around the world, with the exception of countries with religious reasons for abstaining, people love to eat meat. Whether it’s a delicious steak on the barbecue or your mom’s roast chicken, most of us associate good times and family memories with meat of some kind. With the hectic pace at which technology is moving, however, even the simple joy of enjoying meat for dinner may soon be a thing of the past – unless you’re willing to eat synthetic meat, that is. That’s right: We may all soon be forced to eat lab burgers and test tube chicken, if a company called Memphis Meats gets its way.

The U.K.’s Daily Mail recently reported that Memphis Meats – which produces chicken and beef in test tubes from animal cells – has edged considerably closer to its goal of mass producing synthetic meat, after receiving funding from several big hitters, including Richard Branson, Cargill – one of the world’s largest agricultural companies – and the guy who has his finger in every pie: Bill Gates.

That’s the same Bill Gates who said at a 2010 TED conference, “The world today has 6.8 billion people … that’s headed up to about 9 billion. Now if we do a really great job on new vaccines, health care, reproductive health services, we could lower that by perhaps 10 or 15 percent.” [Emphasis added.]

Quite apart from any ethical or other issues related to synthetic meat, it would be wise to think twice about eating “meat” funded by a guy who believes vaccines should be used to reduce the world’s population. (Related: Discover more ways in which Gates and others want to reduce the world’s population at Depopulation.news.)

Collectively, venture capital firm DFJ secured $17 million in investment capital for Memphis Meats from Gates and other members of the wealthy elite.

Although the whole concept of meat grown in a test tube using “fetal bovine serum from unborn calves’ blood” sounds downright disgusting, Memphis is calling its new dinner offerings “clean meat,” and hopes to provide fake burgers, hotdogs, sausages and meatballs to consumers within the next two years.

The company already successfully created a meatball using this technology, and revealed it to the public in February of 2016.

The “philanthropists” involved seem delighted with their investment.

Richard Branson told Bloomberg, “I’m thrilled to have invested in Memphis Meats. I believe that in 30 years or so we will no longer need to kill any animals and that all meat will either be clean or plant-based, taste the same and also be much healthier for everyone.”

Cargill Protein group leader, Brian Sikes, proudly agreed, saying, “At Cargill, we recognize that meat is a core part of consumer diets and central to many cultures and traditions. We believe consumers will continue to choose meat as a protein source, and that is why we are focused on bringing it to their table as sustainably and cost-effectively as we can. Our traditional proteins, as well as new innovations like cultured meats, are both necessary to meet that demand.”

Memphis claims its new technique will produce 90 percent fewer greenhouse emissions (which of course delights the global warming hysterics). The one definite benefit such “meat” would have is that they claim it won’t be injected full of antibiotics. One has to wonder, though, if they will pump it full of growth hormones to speed up production for a global population of billions of people.

Of course, animal lovers will be delighted that animals won’t have to be slaughtered anymore, but the burning question still remains: What about those poor calves needed for the fetal bovine serum?

And where would a meatless world leave all the cattle farmers? How will they adjust?

Finally, with meat being made in test tubes, won’t it be even easier for the powers that be to slip all kinds of things into our food supply?

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

NaturalNews.com

Bloomberg.com

Cargill.com

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